14 Ways to Improve Your Email Copy and Increase Conversions

This is a guest post from Megan Wright at ChamberofCommerce.com.

Email marketing is a strategy that can yield an ROI of as high as $38 for every $1 spent and, thanks to the many tools available today, you can deliver an outstanding customer experience to boost conversion at a low cost.

However, our inboxes are overcrowded. As more brands are tapping into the power of email marketing, it’s not always easy to cut through the clutter and get people to open your emails or take action.

Cut through the clutter by learning to improve your email copy.

The key to email marketing success is to write high-converting copy that focuses on nurturing relationships with your audience, which can increase conversion.

Read on to learn how you can instantly improve your email copy.

1. Set your objectives.

Whether it’s making a sale or reading an article on your website, each email should focus on a single goal. Identify your objective and then decide on the one action you want readers to take.

Then, build the subject line and content around that goal to create a coherent narrative that’ll naturally lead to the CTA. Focusing on one objective also allows you to track metrics effectively, so you can increase the effectiveness of your email copy.

2. Define your audience.

Consumers expect useful and valuable information from brands. They’re much more likely to open and engage with your emails if the content is relevant to them. To understand your audiences’ challenges and desired outcomes, start by creating a series of buyer personas that document their demographic and psychographic information.

Interview your best customers to gather in-depth insights and use social listening tools to learn about the general sentiment. Pay attention to how your audience talks about their pain points and what they want to achieve, so you can adapt their language to write copy that resonates.

3. Segment your email list.

Did you know that marketers experience a 760% increase in revenue by segmenting email campaigns?

Based on buyer personas and customer data (e.g., purchase history, geographic location, preferences, how they interact with previous emails, etc.), you can implement a segmentation strategy to send the most relevant content and offers to each audience group.

Get the segmentation guide.

4. Send personalized content.

After you’ve set up audience segments, you can send personalized emails with targeted content to meet consumers’ expectations and increase your ROI.

For example, personalized email subject lines are found to generate an average of 50% higher open rates.

Improve your email copy by making the content personalized. This Chatbooks email example shows a personalized image of a baby.

Also, incorporate email into your omnichannel marketing strategy by integrating your email platform with a centralized customer database. You can send the most relevant content and offers based on not only audience segments, but also the recipients’ interactions with your brand on other channels.

5. Write a killer subject line.

You can improve your email copy, but your copy won’t achieve anything if you can’t get recipients to open your emails! Given that 33% of recipients decide whether to open an email based on the subject line alone, you can’t afford to ignore this key component.

Find out what’ll entice your audience to open an email. Incorporate urgency, curiosity, mention of special offers, personalized content, relevance, and timeliness into your subject lines and track the open rates to see what makes your subscribers tick.

And if all else fails, consider implementing subject line formulas.

6. Optimize the preheader text.

The preheader text gives you an additional opportunity to tell recipients about the content of your email by expanding on the subject line, so they’re more likely to open your email.

This image shows preheader text, the text that comes after subject lines in an inbox. Optimizing this is a great way to improve your email copy.

Source: Campaign Monitor

Preview text is limited to 35 to 140 characters, depending on the email client and the device used to view the email.

To prevent key information from being truncated, put the most important content first and send out test emails to make sure the copy shows up properly on multiple platforms.

Learn preheader text best practices by watching the short video below.

 

7. Improve legibility.

You can’t get readers to take action if they don’t read through your email, so make sure the content is easy to read and digest.

Write in simple sentences and use short paragraphs. Structure the content logically, focus on one idea in each paragraph, and use white space to improve legibility. Use bullet points to enhance clarity and add images to increase engagement.

8. Use storytelling techniques.

Storytelling is an effective way to build intrigue and get recipients to read your emails. Stories not only entertain your readers, but they also trigger emotions and change brain chemistry.

You can use various storytelling techniques to create email copy that’ll spark the readers’ imagination, trigger emotional responses, and pique curiosity. Paint vivid pictures to engage your audience and build up the narrative to lead to the CTA.

9. Focus on the benefits.

If you want subscribers to read your emails, you need to do more than simply improve your email copy and diction. You also need convince them why it’s worth their while by showing “what’s in it for them” from the get-go.

Communicate how they can benefit from reading the email. For example, learning to overcome a challenge, getting the latest information on a topic they care about, or finding out how to take advantage of a special offer.

Easily optimize your CTAs.

10. Write conversationally.

To nurture relationships with your audience, write conversationally to make them feel like they’re talking to a friend. Don’t be boring and use humor, if appropriate, to make your content more engaging.

Address the readers directly as if you’re speaking to them one on one, eliminating any formalities to help your copy flow. Read your final copy out loud to see how it sounds when spoken. If you encounter a sentence that doesn’t flow well, adjust it until it does.

11. Build emotional connections.

Build brand loyalty and increase conversion by fostering emotional connections with your customers. For example, use language that resonates with your audience.

You can also tell a story to invoke a feeling, leverage relatable analogies to communicate a concept, paint vivid pictures with words to illustrate an idea, or use power words to elicit emotions or actions.

12. Add an appealing CTA.

To increase conversion rates, you need to prompt readers to take action by including an effective CTA in your email copy. The CTA should be clear, ask the recipients to take one simple action, and start with an action word (i.e., a verb).

Writing CTAs are an easy way to improve your email copy, as they need to be short, sweet, and easy-to-understand.

It doesn’t mean you’re hard-selling in every single email. You can ask readers to read an article on your site, share the email, or take a survey. This will help “train” your subscribers, so they’re more likely to take action when you send out an offer.

13. Leverage consumer psychology.

Increase the effectiveness of your email copy by tapping into consumer psychology, such as the fear of missing out (FOMO). For example, you can communicate scarcity and/or urgency (e.g., limited time or quantity) in your email copy to encourage subscribers to take action.

People look for social proof when making purchasing decisions, and you can increase conversion rates by featuring testimonials in your emails. Also, different colors evoke different emotions, so experiment with the designs of your email template and CTA button to optimize results.

14. Test your campaigns.

To find out what works for your business and what makes your audience tick, you need to track the results of your campaigns. Based on the data, you can set up a hypothesis on changes you can make to improve your conversion rates.

Then, use A/B testing to see what works better and make incremental improvements to your email copy. This method can be used to fine-tune your headlines, copy, CTAs, and more to help you find out what works best for your market.

Learn how to A/B test now.

Wrap up

Last but not least, remember that consistency builds trust and trust leads to conversion. Make sure you align everything in each email and the entire campaigns to deliver a consistent customer experience.

However, with the many moving parts involved in email marketing, it’s not always easy to keep track of each campaign and drip sequence. Setting up a system to track all the content can help you orchestrate a customer experience that builds trust and drives conversion.

To make sure that nothing falls through the cracks, you can use a “bullet journal,” which helps you create an index of all the tasks involved in each campaign, while breaking down a complex plan into daily and monthly action items.

No matter how you orchestrate your email marketing strategy, keep in mind that delivering seamless customer experience is the key to building trust and relationships that’ll drive conversions. So, as you’re learning to improve your email copy, be sure to improve your strategy overall.


Megan Wright is the Chief Editor for ChamberofCommerce.com. Chamber specializes in helping small businesses grow their business on the web while facilitating the connectivity between local businesses and more than 7,000 Chambers of Commerce worldwide.

The post 14 Ways to Improve Your Email Copy and Increase Conversions appeared first on Campaign Monitor.

The Top 14 Tips to Writing Email Copy That Converts

This is a guest post from Megan Wright at ChamberofCommerce.com.

Email marketing is highly effective; it’s a marketing channel you can’t afford to ignore.

However, this strategy isn’t a best-kept secret either. With many brands re-upping their efforts in email marketing, your emails have to cut through the clutter and get the attention of your subscribers.

To maximize your ROI, you need to create high-converting email content. Here are 14 effective ways for writing email copy that converts.

Want to be a copywriting pro? Browse our collection.

1. Write an attention-grabbing subject line.

Did you know that 33% of recipients open emails based on subject line alone? Your email won’t generate results if people don’t read them, so it’s important to write subject lines that’ll entice subscribers to open them.

People will open an email if they think they can benefit from the content, fear that they’ll miss out on a good deal, or are intrigued by the title. Incorporating urgency, curiosity, mention of special offers, personalized content, relevance, and timeliness into your subject lines can help increase open rates.

2. Use the preview text wisely.

The preview text appears on the inbox view and tells the recipients more about the content of your email. It gives you a great opportunity to supplement the subject line or highlight another aspect of the content to entice recipients to open the email.

Preview text ranges from 35 to 140 characters, depending on the email client and device on which an email is viewed. Make sure to put the most important content first and send out test emails to see how the preview text appears on different platforms.

3. Follow web copywriting best practices.

People read email copy in a way similar to how they consume web content. Recipients want to know “what’s in it for them,” so you should communicate how they can benefit from reading the email (e.g., learn to solve a problem, see how to take advantage of an offer.)

Use succinct sentences and short paragraphs. Follow a logical structure, communicate one main idea in each paragraph, and use white space strategically to improve legibility. You can also use bullet points to make the content easy to digest and include images to increase engagement.

4. Speak to subscribers thoughtfully.

All caps are often equated with shouting online—and nobody likes to be yelled at. The same goes for multiple exclamation marks in both the subject line and body of an email. Subscribers are looking for thoughtful, conversational emails. Don’t make them feel like they’re on the receiving end of an alert.

Part of thoughtful messaging is knowing which subscribers care about specific emails. Be sure to segment your subscribers into individual lists, making personalized messaging easier. If your emails aren’t personalized, your subscribers will be more likely to trash your sends or ignore them altogether.

5. Know your audience.

People are much more likely to read email content that meets their needs and talk about what’s important to them. To better understand your audience, create a series of buyer personas to document their demographic and psychographic information, as well as their challenges and desired outcomes.

While interviewing your best customers allows you to get in-depth insights, you can also leverage web analytics and social media interactions to learn about your audience. Note how they talk about their pain points and the results they want, so you can use the same language in your email copy.

6. Send personalized content.

Personalized email subject lines generate an average of 50% higher open rates while marketers experience a 760% increase in revenue from segmented campaigns. Sending personalized emails is the key to meeting today’s consumer expectations.

A segmentation strategy allows you to send the most relevant content and offers based on each group’s interaction with your brand, purchase history, geographic location, preferences, and more. This will help you deliver a personalized customer experience to boost conversion rates.

7. Write conversationally.

Email marketing is an effective tool for building trust over time. Writing conversationally, as if you’re talking to someone who’s sitting across the table and having coffee with you, helps you nurture relationships with the readers.

Don’t be boring and inject a sense of humor, if appropriate. Share stories about your brand and customers or a personal anecdote to stir your readers’ imagination. Engaging content makes recipients want to read your emails, giving you the opportunity to build trust and relationships that will increase sales.

8. Appeal to readers’ emotions.

Fostering emotional connections with the audience allows you to build brand loyalty and increase conversions. Understanding the psychology of your audience can help you use the appropriate stories and language that appeal to them.

For example, you can leverage relatable analogies to help readers understand a concept, use sensory words to paint a vivid picture and invoke a visceral feeling, or include power words to stir up emotions or elicit actions.

9. Don’t use shady tactics.

You want to make a sale, but it doesn’t mean you have to use shady marketing tactics or make false promises. Consumers are resistant to those outdated tactics, which can backfire and prompt them to unsubscribe from your list.

The best way to convert and retain customers is to focus on building trust and relationships by being genuine and helpful. Share relevant content and help readers solve their challenges. Then, the transition is natural when you present your solution and ask for the sale.

10. Include an appealing CTA.

If you want to drive conversions, you need to elicit actions from your readers. While you shouldn’t be hard selling in every single email, you should include a CTA that trains them to click on your links. This increases the chances that they’ll take action when you send out an offer.

For example, you can ask them to continue to read an article on your website, take a survey, forward the email, or opt in to receive a piece of free content. The CTA should be clear, start with an action word (i.e., a verb), and ask the readers to take a simple action.

11. Tap into readers’ psychology.

You can increase the effectiveness of your email copy by tapping into consumer psychology. For example, use the fear of missing out (FOMO) to your advantage by communicating scarcity and/or urgency (e.g., limited time or quantity) in your email copy.

You can add social proof or testimonials to your email content and include pictures of people showing the emotion you want to elicit in the readers. Also, experiment with the design of your CTA button, since different colors evoke different emotions.

12. Focus on one objective.

Each email should have one objective. Whether it’s making a sale or getting subscribers to click through to an article, decide on the one action you want the readers to take and then build your content and subject line around that goal.

This will help you create a coherent narrative throughout the email, leading the readers to the CTA. Having one objective also allows you to better measure the effectiveness of the copy, so you can fine-tune your approach to better appeal to the audience.

13. Add a personal touch.

Build relationships with your readers by including a picture of the sender (i.e., you or someone in your organization) in the email. Also, use the sender’s name in the “from” field, so the email will appear to have come from a person rather than a faceless company.

You can also take this opportunity to deliver a diverse experience while maintaining a consistent brand image by assigning different senders for various types of content. For example, a piece from the CEO can be authoritative, while one from the customer success manager can be light-hearted and friendly.

14. Deliver a coherent experience.

Consistency builds trust and trust leads to sales. Not only do you have to align everything in one email (e.g., the subject line, preview text, content, and CTA) but you should also make sure each email delivers on the promise of the opt-in page and a post-click user experience that’s consistent with the content.

In addition, tying a series of emails with a coherent narrative can increase engagement and make subscribers look forward to getting the emails. You can also set up behavior-triggered sequences to deliver relevant content and customer experience based on how recipients interact with previous emails.

Wrap up

With the many moving parts involved in writing email copy that converts, you need a system to track all the content and sequences. This will help you orchestrate a cohesive customer experience that builds trust and drives conversion.

One effective way to keep track of everything and make sure nothing falls through the cracks is to use a “bullet journal.” This method helps you create an overview of the tasks while breaking down a complex plan into daily and monthly action items.

No matter how you orchestrate your email marketing, the key is to deliver a seamless customer experience that’ll help you build trust and relationships to drive conversions.


Megan Wright is the Chief Editor for ChamberofCommerce.com. Chamber specializes in helping small businesses grow on the web while facilitating the connectivity between local businesses and more than 7,000 Chambers of Commerce worldwide.

The post The Top 14 Tips to Writing Email Copy That Converts appeared first on Campaign Monitor.

5 Strategies for Solving Low Email Marketing Engagement Rates

This is a guest post from Megan Wright at ChamberofCommerce.com.

Today’s marketers have access to a huge number of email marketing tools, making it easier than ever before to connect with subscribers where it matters most: in their inboxes.

But just because it’s easy to send marketing emails doesn’t mean that it’s easy to do email marketing well. Nearly every marketer out there can recall at least one message they expected to perform well that ended up falling flat with recipients.

Solving low email marketing engagement rates is critical for improving overall campaign performance. To get to the bottom of any issues that are impairing your engagement, you’ve got to start thinking like an email marketing detective. Here’s how to do it:

Strategy #1: Change your engagement approach.

When we start talking about low email marketing engagement rates, it’s easy to point to factors such as weak subject lines or the lack of a clear CTA. And we’ll get to these and other issues later on in this article, but you’ve got bigger fish to fry first.

One of the biggest drivers behind lackluster email engagement rates is an erratic (or nonexistent) engagement approach. Here’s how it happens:

You convince subscribers to opt into your email list and then you send them a handful of messages. But then…you go dark. You get busy, and sending more messages simply falls off your to-do list (or never makes it there in the first place).

Change your engagement approach to combat low email marketing engagement rates. Realtime does this well by checking in with their subscribers, as this email example shows.

Source: Really Good Emails

Start by creating a welcome series of emails that are sent out at a reasonable frequency. For example, you could create a welcome sequence where the recipient receives a welcome email as soon as they opt into your subscriber list and then receives 5 informational emails spread out over the next 3-5 weeks.

You can get even more technical and create different automation paths based on the subscriber’s behaviors. If they engage with a piece of content you email them about a particular subject, you may want to start sending them more content on that subject.

If you aren’t investing in building a relationship with your subscribers, they aren’t going to engage. Period.

Instead, put some thought into how and when you’ll engage with the people who trust you with their contact info. Test different send frequencies and the lengths of your individual email sequences. Boosting engagement may be as simple as making more of an effort to connect regularly.

Strategy #2: Get personal.

“Emails with personalized subject lines are 26% more likely to be opened.” That’s huge, but it’s not surprising.

Think about the way you engage with your own emails. How likely are you to open a message that doesn’t feel relevant or that doesn’t appear to be tailored to your needs? That’s what makes personalization so powerful.

But, although many marketers hear the word “personalization” and think of slapping recipients’ names into the subject lines of the emails that go out to them, true personalization can be a lot more sophisticated.

A few strategies in particular you may want to test—depending on the capabilities of your email marketing platform—include:

  • Incorporating other personal details into subject lines (such as recipients’ employer name, business name, or city name)
  • Sending targeted offers built around buyer personas, geographic areas, or past purchase behavior
  • Optimizing CTAs and message content to recipients’ lifecycle stage
  • Sending targeted messages prompted by particular engagement patterns on your company’s website

The key to effective personalization is having a strong understanding of who you’re mailing to and what types of messages are most likely to resonate with them.

Segment your subscribers based on the data you already know about them. For example, a high-end online watch retailer may want to send different messages to different customers based on things like how much they spend annually or the brands they like the most.

This level of personalization makes the recipient feel like you actually care about what they like.

If you aren’t clear how they’re likely to view your company and its messaging, revisit your most recent SWOT analysis (or conduct one in the first place) to develop email content that’s likely to connect.

Strategy #3: Use a data-driven testing process.

A/B split testing may be a commonly used marketing practice, but, if it isn’t done correctly, the results it generates won’t be as impactful as possible. In fact, they may even be harmful.

Applying split testing to email marketing campaigns requires that several factors be in place:

  • A hypothesis for the outcome you expect to see
  • An understanding of the components that have the greatest influence on whether or not emails are opened
  • A valid testing process that results in statistical significance

Here’s why these factors matter: If you aren’t working from a sound hypothesis, you’re effectively testing at random.

That effect is amplified if you don’t understand which components drive email open rates, as you’re testing blindly without this understanding.

Finally, if you aren’t monitoring for statistical significance, you can’t be confident that any results you do see—relevant or not—are likely to be replicable in your future email campaigns.

SuperOffice contributor Steven MacDonald suggests that sender name and subject line are the two most important components that get an email opened and read.

Working from that hypothesis, you might decide to focus your testing on these two components before testing other elements of your messaging.

If your tests don’t produce statistically significant results, you can go back to the starting board, choose a new hypothesis, and create a testing protocol that either proves or disproves it.

Strategy #4: Minimize compatibility Issues

Certainly, the quality of your marketing emails is important. But, even if you test your way to the best possible messages for your subscribers, they won’t receive them if you run into compatibility issues on your end.

Your email marketing platform provider should be able to offer guidance on steps you can take to ensure your emails are being delivered as promised. Follow their tips, but do your own due diligence as well.

If you’re sending messages full of HTML images or emails built on templates that display poorly on mobile devices, compatibility issues could prevent your recipients from ever seeing the messages you’ve spent so much time crafting.

Strategy #5: Go with your gut.

Before sending every email, ask yourself, “Would I be happy receiving this message?”

When you’re putting a marketing email together, it can be easy to get caught up in fancy language or fun design tricks.

But, at the end of the day, is your message providing real value to your subscribers? Is the offer it’s making compelling? Does it feel appropriate for the relationship you actually have with your subscribers (versus the one you wish you had)?

Wrap up

If you can’t honestly say that you’d be pleased to see the message in your inbox, iterate instead of sending. A single inappropriate or ill-considered message can destroy a carefully built relationship in an instant.

Hold every message to these quality standards, and your low email marketing engagement rates will quickly become a thing of the past.

Megan Wright is the Chief Editor for ChamberofCommerce.com. As a small business expert, Megan specializes in reporting the latest business news, helpful tips, and reliable resources, as well as providing small business advice.

The post 5 Strategies for Solving Low Email Marketing Engagement Rates appeared first on Campaign Monitor.

How Email Automation Can Support A Seamless Cross-Channel Customer Journey

This is a guest post from Megan Wright at Chamber of Commerce.

More and more organizations are competing on customer experience. In fact, it’s estimated that, by next year, customer experience will overtake price and quality as the key brand differentiator.

This change has lead marketing teams and customer service teams to drill into how customers are engaging with their brand.

It’s no longer just enough to provide a great product at a great value. Customers are now demanding a great experience as well.

So, how can a business create a great customer experience? It starts with building a purposeful customer journey. A customer journey is the experience that you want your customer to have, from first interaction through post-purchase.

The ideal customer journey creates excitement, answers questions, and provides value at every interaction. By creating a wonderful customer journey, you can create a long-term relationship with your customers and increase their lifetime value.

While the concept of offering a great journey seems simple, actually building that journey across multiple channels, can be challenging.

Previously, it might’ve required tons of marketing time spent creating individual emails. Or it could’ve taken a huge customer care staff to tend to each individual. Fortunately, the rise of automation has made building a powerful customer journey much easier.

Using email automation, organizations can better serve the customer with personalized, helpful information based on each individual’s behavior.

Additionally, because email offers so many metrics around engagement, teams can leverage this data to improve efforts over time.

How automation can improve customer experience

Gone are the days where customers will happily sit on hold and be transferred to different agents before finally reaching the right person.

One of the simplest and most impactful ways automation can improve the customer experience is by answering inquiries faster.

Automated email responses

No longer will customers wait days or weeks for an email response. In fact, recent studies suggest that customers expect an email response within six hours—if not even sooner.

Fortunately, email automation can help your CX teams answer immediately, even if they aren’t available.

This automated email provides other ways to reach help and a call to action to check out the new course. This is an organic part of the email customer journey.

Source

This automated email provides other ways to reach help and a call to action to check out the new course.

By dynamically sending a response as soon as a customer emails in, you give them a notification that the message has been received and the assurance that they’ll be responded to quickly.

It’s also a best practice to provide something of value or a link for more information while they wait for your response.

Chatbots

The Chatbot market has exploded over the past few years, and for good reason. These AI-powered tools help guide customers through the customer journey effortlessly, while reducing the total time needed for a customer service rep to handle mundane inquires.

In fact, a recent study conducted by Juniper Research showed that Chatbots are expected to save businesses $8 billion annually by 2022.

Not only are Chatbots saving business money but customers actually like the instant interaction. These chatbots show how automation can be a natural part of the Providing helpful information at the right time strengthens the email customer journey.

Source: SEM Rush

Not only are Chatbots saving business money but customers actually like the instant interaction without having to wait through a phone tree or for someone to respond to an email. When customers get answers fast, it improves the overall customer satisfaction rating (CSAT).

Leveraging Chatbots saves time so customer care agents can then spend time building relationships with customers and dealing with more complex customer issues.

A unified experience

Another important aspect of a great customer journey is that it’s always consistent. Whether a customer is talking to the marketing team, the sales team, or customer care, they should always have the same experience and receive the same answers.

While call scripts and process flows can help a customer service teams manage inquiries the same way, it can be harder to instill a consistent experience across teams.

Fortunately, automation can help teams create a cohesive experience. Whether the customer contacts the business via call, chat, text, or social media inquiry, automation can ensure anyone can handle customer inquiries on any channel.

Today’s top businesses do this by leveraging SCV systems, or Single Customer View systems. An SCV brings all the customer data, knowledge bases, and channel inquiries into a solidified dashboard.

It acts as a central hub for all customer interactions and one-click access to solutions for agents.

These solutions usually integrate disparate systems like Campaign Monitor marketing automation along with communication tools like Chatbots to create a cohesive system for sharing information.

It also tracks customer behavior such as purchase history, site activity, prior calls, and contacts. It paints a highly detailed picture of the customer and can help agents, and any other team members, better anticipate questions and provide more personalized service.

Customers are starting to demand this cross-channel level of customer experience. Thirty-five percent of customers expect to be able to connect with the same agent on any channel and an SCV ensures this can happen.

Automation can fuel the process. Not only can it help streamline and direct interactions, but it can also be used as an effective marketing tool to build customer loyalty and improve customer satisfaction.

You can create specific email flows for different customers based on data you already have about them. For example, Chatbooks is a service that creates photo books from photos you took with your phone.

If a customer is on live chat with a customer service representative and mentions that their baby’s first birthday is coming up, the rep can make a note in their CRM.

Chatbook can then send an offer before their baby’s first birthday to create a highly personalized marketing message.

Chatbooks example

See the Chatbooks customer story here.

Provide helpful information

Providing helpful information at the right time strengthens the customer journey. One way to provide value is through automated trigger emails.

Trigger emails are automatic emails that are sent based off a user’s behavior. This behavior can be visiting a specific landing page, opening a previous email, or even not logging into the software or dashboard.

If you know these behaviors traditionally lead to questions or actions, trigger emails can be helpful to guide the customer to the next step.

A great example of this is right after a new subscriber signs up. Once a new customer signs up for your service, they should automatically go through an onboarding flow. To ensure no step is forgotten, automate the emails.

Once they sign up, send a welcome email with their credentials to log in to the platform or an introductory offer to entice them to make a purchase. Then, send an email that explains what they can expect next.

These emails show you’re excited and keep the process moving, without depending on a single person to send the emails.

Buzzfeed email example

See how Buzzfeed uses email.

Another example of helpful emails that improve the customer experience and your bottom line are abandoned cart emails. Abandoned cart emails can be automatically sent to customers that put an item into their cart and then never checkout.

A missed checkout doesn’t necessarily mean they’re uninterested. In most cases, it means the customer isn’t quite ready to buy or got distracted.

Clearly, this individual is interested, and an abandoned cart email may help them complete their checkout.

Use similar products in your next email or an exclusive offer, if they buy now, to entice the purchase. This too can be helpful during the checkout, as it prevents the user from having to search on their own or forgetting a key piece to their purchase.

The key to either email is to present the information as helpful and not to send too many emails. Just one reminder should be enough.

Birchbox email example

See the Birchbox customer story here.

Bringing it all together

OMI, cross-channel experiences are the new norm for both B2B and B2C businesses. Requests, orders, and questions come from websites, social media, phone, email, text, and in-store visits.

Ninety-eight percent of consumers switch between devices every day. Consumers with multiple devices switch between screen an average of three times a day.

It’s not just devices, either. Eighty-six percent of consumers report “channel hopping” across multiple channels. This means customers might text you on their mobile phone, email you from their desktop, and follow up with a phone call on the same issue.

Organizing teams by platform forces the customer to start over every time they interact. The right software solutions and automation can avoid this.

Automation software and omnichannel teams can avoid the biggest customer complaints of long wait times, inconsistent information, and non-personalized help.

SCV solutions can create a unified database that works across agents and channels. Customers no longer have to repeat themselves. Knowledge bases and training can help make sure agents have the information they need on hand.

Wrap up

Companies that figure out how to offer omnichannel customer care via automation see large gains.

Aberdeen Group’s research shows that companies providing superior omnichannel customer engagement outperform competitors by an average of 9.5%, when it comes to annual revenue.

That’s three times the return over poor performers. While it may take time to set up correctly, automation can create a powerful customer experience that creates a better, more valuable customer.


Megan Wright is the Chief Editor for ChamberofCommerce.com. As a small business expert, Megan specializes in reporting the latest business news, helpful tips, and reliable resources, as well as providing small business advice.

The post How Email Automation Can Support A Seamless Cross-Channel Customer Journey appeared first on Campaign Monitor.