How to Quickly Launch Your Email Marketing Strategy

While many brands already have email in place, messaging needs are changing fast.

Virtual contact is more crucial than ever before, and with communication ramping up online, marketing teams are asking, “how can we quickly launch an email marketing strategy?”

If there was ever a time to reevaluate your current plan, now would be it. Before you can crack down and learn how to quickly launch a new one, however, you need to first look at your marketing strategy as a whole.

Build your marketing calendar with this free guide.

Recap: what makes a successful marketing strategy

A marketing strategy is a brand’s overall plan for not only reaching prospects, but also converting them into leads and eventually, paying customers. When it comes to discussion about what makes up a successful marketing strategy, three main aspects must be defined and met:

  • Understanding who your ideal target audience member is
  • Finding ways to build strong relationships with new customers while also strengthening current relationships
  • A strategy that generates a return on your investment (ROI)

The challenge that most marketing teams run into is determining which marketing channels will suit their needs the most. With so many digital marketing channels available, it can be easy to get overwhelmed. However, a few are considered the most valuable, including:

  • Email
  • Social media
  • Pay-per-click (PPC) advertising
  • Search engine optimization and more

Having multiple channels gives your audience different ways to discover and interact with your brand. In the same breath, it also offers you several ways to communicate with your audience, helping you to build stronger relationships with both new and returning audience members.

How to get engagement (despite algorithms and ad blockers.)

Why email marketing should be the center of your strategy

With so many marketing channels available to choose from, it can be hard to choose which ones will garner the most ROI. However, there’s one that’s a guaranteed win for your brand, especially once you’ve solidified your strategy: email marketing.

Not only does email marketing generate the highest overall ROI, generating an average of $38 for every $1 spent, but it’s the easiest way to reach those who want to hear from you. Email marketing best practices ensures that you’re giving your audience members the option to hear from you, and that requires the use of email opt-in measures.

Not yet sold on the idea of email marketing? Here are a handful of statistics that may help convince you of its benefits:

  • In 2019 alone, approximately 293.6 billion emails were sent and received each day – Statista
  • The average email open rate falls at 17.8% across all industries – Campaign Monitor
  • Total number of email users worldwide in 2019 peaked at 3.9 billion – Statista
  • The click-to-open rate across all industries averages 14.3% – Campaign Monitor

 Number of sent and received emails per day worldwide from 2017 to 2023 (in billions)

Source: Statista

Not only should your marketing team be investing their time in your email marketing strategy, but it should be the center point of your whole marketing strategy.

Why? Because all significant digital marketing channels can be utilized to funnel new leads into your email subscriber list.

Once there, you can easily segment your subscribers into appropriate lists, ensuring that you’re sending only the most relevant information to every person. This is essential because 72% of consumers state that they exclusively engage with brands that send out personalized content via email.

How to quickly launch your email marketing strategy in 6 steps

Now that you’re refreshed on what makes up a successful marketing strategy and why email marketing plays such a crucial role in the process, it’s time to focus your attention on how to quickly launch your email marketing strategy. There’s more to it than just creating a stunning email template and sending it out.

Here are six steps to developing and launching your email marketing strategy.

1. Know who your target audience is.

The number one rule of email marketing is to know who your targeted audience members are and what it is they’re looking for from you.

Your target audience is made up of individuals of a certain group that are looking for something very particular. For example, our friends at Emma have a target audience that’s made up of marketing professionals. More specifically, marketing professionals who practice email marketing. So they tailor their email content to that particular audience.

Example of an email targeting an ideal audience member

Source: Really Good Emails

2. Analyze your current strategy.

Once you’ve nailed down your ideal target audience member, you need to take some time to analyze your current marketing strategy and how successful it’s been for you up until this point. This requires you to take adequate time to review each part of your marketing strategy—whether it be social media, PPC advertisements, or even more traditional channels, such as TV ads or mailers.

One way to analyze your strategy’s success is by reviewing your overall ROI for each channel. If you see substantial returns, then that marketing channel is likely one you should keep and integrate into your new strategy. Alternatively, if you don’t see ROI from a certain channel, it’s time to consider axing it in favor of something new.

3. Research your competitors.

If you’re feeling stuck and unsure of how you can improve your marketing strategy, then you and your team should do a bit of research into what your competitors are doing. This is called a competitive analysis and helps you see how others in your particular industry or niche are approaching their marketing tactics.

While you can take the time and follow competitors on their social media platforms or subscribe to their newsletters to see what they’re up to, there are several tools available to help you conduct competitive analysis, including SEMrush.

Example of a SEMrush Competitive Analysis

Source: SEMrush

4. Set reasonable goals.

Once you’ve done your research, it’s time to start laying out your goals. What is it that you hope to achieve through your email marketing strategy? How’re you going to achieve each of them? You want to be SMART about your goal setting, and that means taking the time to outline every aspect of each one of your goals. From what it is to how you’ll achieve it, and in what time frame—the more detailed, the better.

SMART Goal Setting Defined

Source: Content Marketing Institute

5. Build your email list.

You’ve done your research and you’ve outlined your goals in as much detail as you could. Now it’s time to start building your email list. If you already have an existing list, then you want to reach out and see if each subscriber still wants to remain on your list. Sending out an email confirmation or opt-in is the only way to ensure that those on your emailing list want to be there.

 Email List Confirmation Opt-In

Source: Really Good Emails

If you’re building your email list from scratch, there are several ways to help you get started, including:

  • Dedicated landing pages, such as a newsletter signup
  • Utilizing blog CTAs to encourage email signups
  • Social media posts/ads encouraging potential leads to join your community
  • Offering up free content/tools (otherwise known as gated content) for those who share their email for a download or access to a tool and so much more

Newsletter Signup Landing Page

Source: Campaign Monitor

Once you have your email list ready, you want to make sure you’re taking the time to segment your list into detailed categories. This ensures that you’re sending out only the most relevant information to those who want it. You can segment your lists in several ways, including:

  • Age
  • Gender
  • Location and more

The more detailed information you can get, the better. However, if you aren’t comfortable with asking for more detailed information, then consider supplying your subscribers with an email preference center that gives them the opportunity to tell you exactly what they’re expecting from you.

 Email Preference Center Example

Source: Campaign Monitor

6. Determine which email campaigns will best suit your needs.

Now that you’ve started building your audience and you have an idea of what they want to receive from you, it’s finally time to determine which email campaigns will best suit your consumers’ needs, while helping you reach your marketing goals.

There are dozens of different email campaigns that your marketing team can choose from, including:

  • Welcome series
  • Promotional campaigns
  • Newsletters
  • New content announcements
  • Product/service update or launch announcements
  • Transactional emails and more

Take a detailed look at who your audience is, why they’ve come to you for their needs, and review their email preferences, as these will all help you determine the best types of email campaigns you should be sending out.

Wrap up

When it comes to learning how to quickly launch your email marketing strategy, it’s not nearly as challenging as some may think. This is especially true when you follow these six steps:

  • Know your ideal targeted audience.
  • Evaluate your current plan.
  • Conduct a competitive analysis.
  • Set SMART goals.
  • Continuously build your email subscriber list.
  • Decide which email campaigns suit both your needs and those of your subscribers.

Looking for more information on how to quickly launch your email marketing strategy? Be sure to check out our complete email marketing guide for beginners.

What is Campaign Monitor?

The post How to Quickly Launch Your Email Marketing Strategy appeared first on Campaign Monitor.

The Definitive Guide to Landing Pages

As a digital marketing professional, you understand that email marketing is only one part of a larger puzzle. For your email marketing efforts to pay off, your email subscribers need to be directed somewhere, where certain actions can be taken.

That’s where your website’s landing pages come into play.

Read on to discover the importance of landing pages and how they work alongside email marketing to net you the desired results.

Guide to landing pages: What purpose do these pages serve?

A landing page is a specific web page on your website that your subscribers are directed to via various methods. This can be through an email CTA or even a social media post. A landing page is different from a typical web page because it serves a particular purpose.

For example, many of our emails and blog CTAs take Leads to our request for a live demo landing page.

Example of a Campaign Monitor landing page

Source: Campaign Monitor

This page serves a single purpose: requesting a live demo of Campaign Monitor and the services available to marketing professionals. Those interested simply fill out the form and then click the “submit” CTA to get started.

So, while landing pages have a very a very focused directive, they serve a very critical role in your overall marketing strategy: to convert website visitors into new leads. If implemented correctly, a well-designed landing page is almost guaranteed to get you the conversions you’re looking for.

Your guide to different types of landing pages

Marketers understand that each offer or promotion requires its own landing page to get the attention it deserves. In fact, studies have shown that companies who increase their number of landing pages from 10 to 15 see an average increase in leads of 55%.

However, many individuals don’t understand that several different types of landing pages can and should be utilized depending on the type of campaign being run. This has led to 48% of landing pages containing multiple offers, which can drastically decrease the overall conversion rate by up to 266%

That’s why it’s crucial to have the right landing page for each of your campaigns. Not every landing page will be a product detail page, and research shows that other landing pages typically perform better than a typical product detail page.

Product Detail Pages vs. All Other Landing Pages

Source: Marketing Charts

That said, it’s essential to consider adding a variety of different landing pages to your digital marketing strategy, and we’ve provided some information on the most popular landing pages used by marketing teams today.

Lead capture page

A lead capture page is a landing page designed to encourage website viewers to leave their personal information in exchange for a good or service. Typically, marketers begin by sending an email to new subscribers that outlines various perks of their subscription. From there, users are encouraged to click on a CTA that brings them to a landing page where they’ll fill out a form to gain access to something.

The MarketingProfs team does a good job of this. Their welcome email currently includes a link to an “exclusive look” at Nancy Harhut’s MarketingProfs B2b Forum presentation. If you click on that lead capture CTA in the email, you’re taken to the first landing page, which delivers the promised material. From there, you’re encouraged to sign up for the 2020 forum and are then asked for more information on landing page 2.

 Email marketing and landing page examples

Source: Gmail/MarketingProfs Landing Page 1/MarketingProfs Landing Page 2

Sales page

Sales pages, while some of the most relevant landing pages in your digital marketing arsenal, are the ones that are the most commonly misused.

Some of the most effective sales landing pages are longer in nature and can generate up to 220% more leads than landing pages with above-the-fold CTAs. However, what works for some may not work for all, so you should always be A/B testing your landing pages before making them live for everyone.

In this example, the sales page is broken up into different sections, providing viewers with options to review before making their final decision.

Example of a sales landing page

Source: Living Language via Instapage

Click-through page

Click-through landing pages are great when you’re working with a new prospect and want to warm them up to an offer. Remember the example above by MarketingProfs? That’s an excellent example of a click-through landing page because it moves the prospect from the welcome email to the initial landing page, and then to an exclusive offer landing page for the 2020 Forum.

Another great way to incorporate a click-through landing page is by using free trial offers or with a “Get a quote” CTA. This encourages your consumers to click-through and gives you some information to move forward with the process of learning more or getting access to the free trial.

Click-through landing page example

Source: Nationwide

Splash page

Splash pages are typically used to inform your visitor or something prior to giving them access to another landing page or blog post. This doesn’t usually ask your visitors for any information and acts more like a welcome page of sorts. Other types of splash pages could include short, quick forms that enable you to gather vital user data.

Example of a splash landing page

Source: Forbes via Instapage

Squeeze page

Squeeze pages are designed to capture a prospect’s email address to grow a brand’s email list. These pages often pop up while you’re scrolling through a website or article, and they often ask you to sign up for the brand’s newsletter to stay in the loop without having to search the brand later.

For example, GQ includes a squeeze on its homepage. It appears as the visitor scrolls through the homepage material and encourages them to sign up to stay on top of the GQ trending stories.

 Example of a squeeze landing page.

Source: GQ

Other examples of squeeze pages are those that pop up after you’ve visited a website so many times, and they require you to sign up before you can view any other content.

Example of a gated squeeze page that requires a subscription to view more content

Source: The Business Times

Guide to landing pages: Design best practices

Just like any other marketing material, knowing design best practices for landing pages is an absolute must. There are many different design best practices out here; however, when it comes to landing pages, these are some of the most vital practices to keep in mind:

  • Put your audience first by designing with them in mind. That means designing for the skimmers, including images and videos, to help break up large blocks of text and making your CTAs easily identifiable and actionable.
  • Consider your own goals during the design phase. You can’t neglect your marketing goals, or else these landing pages won’t serve your brand in any way. What purpose does each page serve? What solutions will it help provide your audience members? What’s the best way to encourage action on each page?
  • Focus primarily on the benefit for your audience members. What pain points are you addressing? How’s this page/product/service going to make their lives easier/better? Don’t focus heavily on the specific features; instead, outline how this is going to address the problem they’re seeking answers to.
  • Be as specific as you can, or else risk confusing your prospects. This is particularly important if you have multiple offers running at the same time. Remember, you want to have a landing page for each of your active campaigns. That way, there’s little chance of confusion for those clicking links for a specific product, deal, or campaign.
  • Always run an A/B test before letting your page go live. What works for one campaign may not work for the next. So make sure you’re taking adequate time to test your landing pages for limited periods of time and track your results to see which one gets you the best results. Whichever variation wins is the one you should put up permanently.

Landing pages and email marketing work together when done correctly.

While some may believe that landing pages are strictly related to your online presence and digital marketing strategy, remember that your marketing strategy is made up of multiple puzzle pieces. Once you’ve got your landing page ready to go, you can start including them into your email marketing strategy.

For example, MacPaw does a wonderful job of creating a sales landing page that they incorporate into their holiday sales email campaign. Instead of laying out all the options for consumers, they include a 30% off CTA, and, should the consumer be interested in the offer, they can click through to the sales landing page to see all the available offers.

 Example of email marketing and landing pages working together

Source: Really Good Emails/MacPaw

Wrap up

Landing pages play a vital role in your digital marketing strategy, and it’s essential to understand that not every landing page is created equally. That’s why this guide to landing pages focused heavily on the varying types of landing pages that should be incorporated into your marketing strategy:

  • Squeeze pages
  • Sales pages
  • Lead capture pages
  • Splash pages
  • Click-through pages

Ready to see what Campaign Monitor can do for you? Then request your live demo today!

The post The Definitive Guide to Landing Pages appeared first on Campaign Monitor.

The Definitive Guide to Landing Pages

As a digital marketing professional, you understand that email marketing is only one part of a larger puzzle. For your email marketing efforts to pay off, your email subscribers need to be directed somewhere, so that certain actions can be taken.

That’s where your website’s landing pages come into play. Read on to discover the importance of landing pages, as well as how they work alongside email marketing to net you the desired results.

Guide to landing pages: what purpose do these pages serve?

A landing page is a specific web page on your website that your subscribers are directed to via various sales/marketing tactics. This can be through an email CTA or even a social media post. A landing page is different from a typical webpage because it serves a particular purpose.

For example, many of our emails and blog CTAs take leads to our request for a live demo landing page.

Example of a Campaign Monitor landing page

Source: Campaign Monitor

This page serves a single purpose: requesting a live demo of Campaign Monitor and the services available to marketing professionals. Those interested simply fill out the form and then click the “submit” CTA to get started.

So, while landing pages have a focused directive, they serve a critical role in your overall marketing strategy: to convert website visitors into new leads. If implemented correctly, a well-designed landing page is almost guaranteed to get you the conversions you’re looking for.

Your guide to different types of landing pages

Marketers understand that each offer or promotion requires its own landing page to get the attention it deserves. In fact, studies have shown that companies that increase their number of landing pages from 10 to 15 see an average increase in leads of 55%.

However, many individuals don’t understand that several different types of landing pages can and should be utilized, depending on the type of campaign being run. This has led to 48% of landing pages containing multiple offers, which can drastically decrease the overall conversion rate by up to 266%

That’s why it’s crucial to have the right landing page for each of your campaigns. Not every landing page will be a product detail page, and research shows that other landing pages typically perform better than a typical product detail page.

Product detail pages vs. all other landing pages

Source: Marketing Charts

It’s essential to consider adding a variety of different landing pages to your digital marketing strategy, and we’ve provided some information on the most popular landing pages used by marketing teams today.

Lead capture page

A lead capture page is a landing page designed to encourage website viewers to leave their personal information in exchange for a good or service. Typically, marketers begin by sending an email to new subscribers that outlines various perks of their subscription. From there, users are encouraged to click on a CTA that brings them to a landing page where they’ll fill out a form to gain access to something.

The MarketingProfs team does a good job of this. Their welcome email currently includes a link to an “exclusive look” at Nancy Harhut’s MarketingProfs B2b Forum presentation. If you click on that lead capture CTA in the email, you’re taken to the first landing page, which delivers the promised material. From there, you’re encouraged to sign up for the 2020 forum and are then asked for more information on landing page 2.

 Email marketing and landing page examples

Source: Gmail/MarketingProfs Landing Page 1/MarketingProfs Landing Page 2

Sales page

Sales pages, while some of the most relevant landing pages in your digital marketing arsenal, are the ones that are the most commonly misused.

Some of the most effective sales landing pages are longer in nature and can generate up to 220% more leads than landing pages with above-the-fold CTAs. However, what works for some may not work for all, so you should always be A/B testing your landing pages before making them live for all.

In this example, the sales page is broken up into different sections, providing viewers with options to review before making their final decision.

Example of a sales landing page

Source: Living Language via Instapage

Click-through page

Click-through landing pages are great when you’re working with a new prospect and want to warm them up to an offer. Remember the example above by MarketingProfs? That’s an excellent example of a click-through landing page because it moves the prospect from the welcome email to the initial landing page, and then to an exclusive offer landing page for the 2020 Forum.

Another great way to incorporate a click-through landing page is by using free trial offers or with a “get a quote” CTA. This encourages your consumers to click through and gives you some information to move forward with the process of learning more or getting access to the free trial.

Click-through landing page example

Source: Nationwide

Splash page

Splash pages are typically used to inform your visitor or something prior to giving them access to another landing page or blog post. This doesn’t usually ask your visitors for any information and acts more like a welcome page of sorts. Other types of splash pages could include short, quick forms to enable you to gather vital user data.

Example of a Splash landing page

Source: Forbes via Instapage

Squeeze page

Squeeze pages are designed to capture a prospect’s email address to grow a brand’s email list. These pages often pop up while you’re scrolling through a website or article, and they often ask you to sign up for the brand’s newsletter to stay in the loop without having to search the brand later.

For example, GQ includes a squeeze on its homepage. It appears as the visitor scrolls through the homepage material and encourages them to sign up to stay on top of the GQ trending stories.

Example of a squeeze landing page.

Source: GQ

Other examples of squeeze pages are those that pop up after you’ve visited a website so many times, and they require you to sign up before you can view any other content.

Example of a gated squeeze page that requires a subscription to view more content

Source: The Business Times

Guide to landing pages: design best practices

Just like any other marketing material, knowing design best practices for landing pages is an absolute must. There are many different design best practices out here; however, when it comes to landing pages, these are some of the most vital practices to keep in mind:

  • Put your audience first by designing with them in mind. That means designing for the skimmers, including images and videos, to help break up large blocks of text and making your CTAs easily identifiable and actionable.
  • Consider your own goals during the design phase. You can’t neglect your marketing goals, or else these landing pages won’t serve your brand in any way. What purpose does each page serve? What solutions will it help provide your audience members? What’s the best way to encourage action on each page?
  • Focus primarily on the benefit for your audience members. What pain points are you addressing? How’s this page/product/service going to make their lives easier/better? Don’t focus heavily on the specific features. Instead, outline how this is going to address the problem they’re seeking answers to.
  • Be as specific as you can, or else risk confusing your prospects. This is particularly important if you have multiple offers running at the same time. Remember, you want to have a landing page for each of your active campaigns. That way, there’s little chance of confusion for those clicking on links for a specific product, deal, or campaign.
  • Always run an A/B test before letting your page go live. What works for one campaign may not work for the next, so make sure you’re taking adequate time to test your landing pages for limited periods of time and track your results to see which one gets you the best results. Whichever variation wins is the one you should put up permanently.

Landing pages and email marketing work together when done correctly.

While some may believe that landing pages are strictly related to your online presence and digital marketing strategy, remember that your marketing strategy is made up of multiple puzzle pieces. Once you’ve got your landing page ready to go, you can start including them into your email marketing strategy.

For example, MacPaw does a wonderful job of creating a sales landing page that they incorporate into their holiday sales email campaign. Instead of laying out all the options for consumers, they include a 30% off CTA, and should the consumer be interested in the offer; they can click through to the sales landing page to see all the available offers.

 Example of email marketing and landing pages working together

Source: Really Good Emails/MacPaw

Wrap up

Landing pages play a vital role in your digital marketing strategy, and it’s essential to understand that not every landing page is created equally. That’s why this guide to landing pages focused heavily on the varying types of landing pages that should be incorporated into your marketing strategy:

  • Squeeze pages
  • Sales pages
  • Lead capture pages
  • Splash pages
  • Click-through pages

Ready to see what Campaign Monitor can do for you? Then request your live demo today.

The post The Definitive Guide to Landing Pages appeared first on Campaign Monitor.

10 Habits of Highly Effective Marketers

What does it take to be successful at email marketing? Many factors influence email program performance, from budget and staff to technology. But the person managing an email program can have the most significant impact on success.

Just as author Stephen R. Covey’s book The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People® sets out a guide to help people accomplish their goals, the following principles can help email marketers revolutionize their email programs.

1. Set clearly defined goals. Common goals such as “grow the email file” and “generate more ROI” are a great starting point but aren’t specific enough. What is your target percentage of list growth? How much ROI increase are you targeting for each customer segment? Defining your email marketing program goals helps focus your time and effort while making it easier to measure success.

Not sure where to start? The most successful marketers consider the goals of the broader business and align email program goals accordingly. This approach is more likely to get executive support and collaboration from other departments to more effectively reach your goals.

2. Have a plan. Effective email marketers not only define what they want to accomplish, but how they’ll reach those goals. Mapping out an action plan helps you determine the tools, resources and time you’ll need to be successful. Once you have defined goals and crafted your action plan, it’s time to communicate them to people or teams in your organization who may assist those efforts. Your ability to get buy-in from dependent resources is critical.

3. Know your customers/prospects. Too often brands consider what they want to tell customers before first considering what customers want to hear. That level of understanding is only possible when marketers take the time to get to know customers and prospects. The most effective marketers consider who users are and why they are using their products or services. They think of personalized marketing as person-to-person marketing.

Most people see a daily influx of marketing messages in their inbox, so to keep subscribers engaged your messages need to be targeted, relevant and provide value. Understanding who your subscriber is helps you more effectively communicate with the individuals receiving your messages.

4. Hold yourself to a higher standard. Most people adapt to whatever environment they find themselves in. If you’re feeling stuck and not making progress, you need to aspire to standards that truly challenge you. It’s how you push yourself out of your comfort zone to improve.

If you’re only measuring success based on last year’s program performance, challenge yourself to measure against benchmarks for the email industry, or your specific brand vertical. Consider the marketing strategies and testing tactics of best-in-class senders. If you want to achieve more, you should look at the email programs – and people who will hold you to a higher standard than you currently hold yourself.

5. Take risks while accepting and learning from failure. If everything you do is working, you probably aren’t taking enough risks. Even if you accomplish small wins often, without risk you likely won’t challenge yourself to tackle the big wins that will elevate your program in a significant way.

Risk-taking is what helps us learn and grow. Seeking out new perspectives, challenging assumptions and testing new approaches can lead to significant growth. Even when risk-taking fails, it is an opportunity to discuss what went wrong in order to learn from that failure and refine your future approach.

6. Educate to innovate. The ever changing and evolving email landscape requires marketers to stay current on technologies, trends and emerging tactics. The most successful marketers use that knowledge to come up with new ideas, methods and solutions to exceed customer expectations, overcome program challenges and stand out from the competition.

7. Ask questions. Often when you ask questions, you discover something new. Discovery can lead to new ideas and perspectives you may not have otherwise considered. Eric Schmidt, former CEO of Google said, “We run this company on questions, not answers.” Asking questions is the best way to get information needed to make informed decisions. If you keep asking questions you can keep finding better answers.

8. Test/learn/apply; repeat. Testing is critical for any successful email program. The results analysis and application of findings can optimize every aspect of your program performance, from send times and frequency to subject lines and content. Yet many marketers struggle with knowing what, when, how and to whom they should be testing

Successful marketers recognize the importance of building a testing strategy which is aligned with email program goals and includes clear objectives and defined measures of success. They look beyond standard KPI metrics such as opens and clicks and consider how to influence the subscriber journey and customer’s lifetime value.

9. Take advantage of digital tools. According to a survey by Litmus, for every dollar invested in email marketing, marketers can get a return of over $38, an ROI of 3800%! But in order to run successful email campaigns, you need effective email marketing tools to help you work smarter, not harder while scaling growth.

The right digital tools can help you with every aspect of program optimization, from campaign creation and segmentation to testing and analysis. Take the time to evaluate available tools and resources and determine which will best support your goals and objectives.

10. Information share. Poor communication can cost organizations an average of more than $7,000 a day, according to a study done by Harvard Business Review. One of the most significant challenges to effective communication involves people and teams operating in silos and not sharing information. This lack of collaboration damages innovation, performance and growth.

Success requires communication and collaboration both internally and externally. Share your goals, strategies and results with internal teams. Take time to hear their feedback and suggestions. And don’t underestimate the power of external networking. Join industry groups and attend conferences where you can learn from others who are challenging themselves to innovate and excel.

Colin Powell said “There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, and learning from failure.” While being successful may mean different things to different people, becoming successful at email marketing requires embracing most, if not all of the elements above.

This post originally appeared on MarTech Cube